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Works Performance Products, Inc.
21045 Osborne St. Canoga Park, CA. 91304
Phone 818-701-1010 Fax 818-701-9043

Frequently Asked Questions

  • FOUR-WHEELED ATV FRONT SHOCKS, CONSTRUCTION AND FEATURES

    • Q: What's the advantage of remote reservoirs?
    • A: Works shocks are pressurized with nitrogen. Standard Works shocks are a gas-emulsion type--that means that the nitrogen is charged into the oil. The remote reservoirs are attached to the shocks through a hose that transfers oil. Inside the reservoir is a polyurethane bladder that separates the nitrogen from the oil. There are two advantages to this. One is that the oil capacity of the shock is increased, which aids in cooling the shock fluid and increases the service life of the oil; and the second is that the compression and rebound valving will stay consistent under the most severe off-road terrain or closed-course track conditions.

    • Q:  I ride pretty hard, but I don't race. Do you think I would need the reservoirs?
    • A: It depends. All Works shocks are custom-built to your riding weight, type of terrain and vehicle, so even the non-reservoir shocks will be a vast improvement over the stock shocks. The reservoirs are really a necessity if the Quad is run in long-distance races for hours at a time, or on extremely rough racetracks with motos of 20 minutes or more. If you purchase the shocks without reservoirs, but you decide at some future date that you need them, they can be added to the shocks at that time.

    • Q:  Can you repair my original equipment front shocks?
    • A: No. In many cases the stock shocks are sealed units, and in other cases the repair or replacement parts are not available. However, Works Shocks are fully rebuildable and repairable. All of our parts are available individually. Repairing damage or replacing worn seals and other parts can be done by Works or by many dealers. This is the last pair of shocks you'll ever have to buy for your Quad.

    • Q:  Are Works A-T Steelers durable shocks?
    • A: Yes. The bodies consist of a steel pressure cylinder welded to a cast steel eye end and then bright cadmium plated, which is an aluminum-like finish. Works exclusive valving design piston is wrapped in a Teflon and bronze composite piston ring to eliminate any metal-to-metal contact inside the shock. Heavy-duty, hard-chromed shafts, billet machined components and chrome-silicon wire springs are top of the line in quality and durability.

    • Q:  What is the reason for the dual- or triple-rate springs? My stock shocks only have a single spring.
    • A: The dual- or triple-rate springs allow the optimum spring rates for each application. These multi-rate springs are soft at the beginning to soak up the small bumps, but "cross over" to the stiff part of the rate to resist bottoming on jumps and other big "hits." The dual-rate springs have two rates, a soft and stiff, while the triple rate adds a "medium" rate in between. The application of single-, dual-, or triple-rate springs is based on the overall length of the shocks, the shaft travel, and available spring rates. Customer requirements also make a difference.

    • Q:  I have installed 2-inch over arms. Will your shocks work with these long arms?
    • A: Yes, longer A-arms are part of the information that we require to calculate the correct spring and valving rates for each pair of front shocks. If you purchase Works shocks for the stock A-arms and then later install the long arms, Works can modify your shocks for maximum performance for the long arms. Depending on the length and manufacture of the longer arms, valving and springing can vary by as much as 30 percent, so this is vital information in the construction of the shocks.

    • Q: If I order shocks for my vehicle, how long will it take to get them?
    • A: Since all of Works shocks are built to order, based on the rider's weight, intended use, modifications to the suspension arms, etc., the time required to build a pair of shocks to your specifications varies a lot. Depending on the time of year, and the volume of orders, your shocks can take from one to five weeks to build.

    • Q: Why don't you just make a bunch of them and keep them in stock?
    • A: If Works made what we call "generic" shocks, where one shock is made to fit all riders--such as the original equipment shocks-- we would be defeating our main goal. That goal is: to build the best set of shocks you can buy for the money; built to your needs, that you won't have to change, adjust or modify to fit your riding requirements. Obviously, a 220 -pound motocross rider has different requirements than a 120 -pound. rider who rides rocky trails. Shoe manufacturers don't just make one size of shoe, and Works doesn't make just one "size" of shock. Sure, it takes a little longer to get the shocks, but we feel that you'll think that it's worth the wait.

  • STOCK (ORIGINAL EQUIPMENT) SHOCK REPAIRS

    • Q:   Do you work on stock shocks?
    • A: Yes, we do rebuilds and repairs on many stock rear single shocks on ATVs and motorcycles. It depends on the type and diameter of shock. Some shocks are not rebuildable. Some that are rebuildable we don't rebuild because of availability of parts and components.

    • Q: If my shock is rebuildable, what repairs can you make?
    • A: We can do a number of services on that shock. As long as the body and shaft are in good shape, we can replace the seal and bushing, fill the shock with fresh oil and charge it with nitrogen. These repairs usually cost between $60 and $100 depending on the shock and what is necessary.

    • Q:  Does this change the damping? Is it a re-valve?
    • A: We can also do a re-valve on this shock. It's called the Heart Transplant. We replace the stock piston with the patented Work Performance check-ball and spring piston, piston ring and valving components. Most other shock tuners' re-valves consist of adding a few shims. With a Works' re-valve you get a complete piston assembly, and for about the same price. The Heart Transplants are custom-valved to your vehicle, your riding weight and the kind of riding or racing that you do. All this for only $179.00. If you add the heart transplant to the seal and bushing repair, then you can save about $50.00 off of the repairs.

    • Q: My shaft doesn't look too good, can you re-chrome my shaft?
    • A: If the shaft is scratched or bent, but the shock tube bore is not worn too large, then we can install one of our cartridges. The cartridge includes a new shaft--which is larger and stronger than the stock shaft--an eye or clevis, a seal holder, foam bumper, and the Works Performance Heart Transplant piston. The cartridges are available with fixed rebound valving, or with seventeen-position adjustable rebound valving.

    • Q: What is the difference in price for the cartridge?
    • A: The standard cartridge is $269.00 installed in your serviceable shock body. The adjustable cartridge is $369.00 installed in your serviceable shock body.

    • Q: What's the advantage of the adjustable cartridge over the standard? Would I need it?
    • A: Both cartridges are set up to your riding weight, your type of riding and to the vehicle. On the standard cart, the rebound valving is calculated to match these specifications so that you won't have to make any adjustments. However, if this is for competition, or you have always made adjustments before, then you will want the adjustable rebound feature to compensate for different types of tracks or terrain. The advantage of either cartridge is that your shock will perform much better than it did--even when it was new.

    • Q: How do I know if my shock body is good, or if my shaft is really OK? Can I just get the repairs made?
    • A: Sure. When we get the shock we will disassemble it and inspect the parts thoroughly. Then we can call you with your options: repair, Heart Transplant, or cartridge replacement; or if the shock is not repairable, a replacement shock. You can decide. There is a $20.00 charge for the disassembly. If the shock can be repaired, the $20.00 is applied to the repairs. If the stock shock cannot be repaired, the $20.00 is applied to the purchase price of a new Works Performance shock.

    • Q: Well, my hose is busted and the shock is all apart. Can you fix it?
    • A: As long as all the parts are there, it is usually possible. There is a charge of $20.00 for "Basket Case" shocks. It is not deducted from repairs or service. However, it can be applied to the price of a new Works Performance shock, if the "Basket" is not serviceable.

    • Q: What do I have to do to send in the shock for repair or re-valve?
    • A: Send the complete shock, and include a note with your name, return address, and phone number where you can be reached during the day (or answering machine). Also state the year, make and model of your vehicle, your riding weight, type of riding, and whether or not the swingarm is stock or modified. Then, explain what repairs you are seeking, ask for an estimate and we'll call you. If you wish to pay with a credit card (MC or Visa), include that number, the name on the card and the expiration date. If you are not paying with a credit card, include a check or money order for $20.00, payable to Works Performance.
      Send all of this to:
        Works Performance Products, Inc.
        Attn.: Stock Shock Department.
        21045 Osborne St., Canoga Park, CA 91304
      When the repairs or upgrades are finished and ready to ship, the balance due plus shipping charges will be charged to the credit card, or shipped CODcertified funds.

  • RE-VALVING STOCK REAR SHOCKS

    • Q:  Do you re-valve stock shocks?
    • A: Yes, we can repair and re-valve many ATV and motorcycle stock rear single shocks. It depends on the type and diameter of shock. On some of the shocks, we choose not to re-valve because the body diameter is so small, that a re-valve will not cure the damping problems that you are experiencing. Some shocks we choose not to service because replacement parts are non-existent. Shock replacement is really what is necessary in that case.

    • Q: What does your re-valve consist of?
    • A: A Works' re-valve is called the Heart Transplant. We replace the stock piston with the patented Works Performance check-ball and spring piston, piston ring and valving components. Most other shock tuners re-valves consist of adding or removing a few shims. With a Works' re-valve you get a complete piston assembly, and for about the same price. The Heart Transplants are custom-valved to your vehicle, your riding weight and the kind of riding or racing that you do. All this for $179.00. If you need seals and the shaft bushing replaced, these repairs can be included for an additional $25.00 to $50.00, depending on what is necessary.

    • Q: I need a re-valve because: TOO SOFT
      1.  The shock is just too soft for the way I ride.
      2.   I put an extended swingarm on and now the shock is too soft.
      3.   I'm a really big guy and the shock bottoms all the time.
    • A: We can cure the problem of being too soft. Our computer will determine a valving profile that will soak up the big hits and jumps without making the ride harsh. Depending on the stock spring rate, we can often fix the "too soft" condition with a damping change, but your application may need a stiffer spring. When we get the shock and measure the spring, we can make that determination and call you with an estimate. Usually, replacement springs run from $80.00 to $100.00.

    • Q:  I need a re-valve because: TOO STIFF
      1. I ride cross-country and the shock is too harsh on small ruts and tree roots.
      2. The bike is hard to control on stutter bumps, or washboard sections. It makes the back end hop around.
    • A: We can cure the problem of being too stiff. Our patented piston design allows an extremely wide range of damping from high-speed to low-speed. You can eliminate the harshness at low speeds on small bumps without sacrificing the high-speed damping necessary to soak up the big ruts, ditches, holes and jumps. Our computer-calibrated valving profile is custom-fit to each application and rider. You get the performance you want.

    • Q: My shock may be worn out inside, even though its not leaking. Can you put a heart transplant in a worn out shock?
    • A: As long as the shock body bore is not worn oversize and the shaft isn't missing chrome or is scratched badly, we can install a Heart Transplant and make the repairs. If the shaft is damaged, then we can install a cartridge. If you are unsure of the condition of the shock, we can disassemble and inspect the parts and advise you. The cost of this disassembly is $20.00. If the shock is serviceable, this charge is applied to the Heart Transplant, Cartridge installation or purchase price of a replacement Works Performance shock.

    • Q: What do I have to do to send in the shock for repair or re-valve?
    • A: Send the complete shock, and include a note with your name, return address, and phone number where you can be reached during the day (or answering machine). Also state the year, make and model of your vehicle, your riding weight, type of riding, and whether or not the swingarm is stock or modified. Then, explain what repairs you are seeking, ask for an estimate and we'll call you. If you wish to pay with a credit card (MC or Visa), include that number, the name on the card and the expiration date. If you are not paying with a credit card, include a check or money order for $20.00, payable to Works Performance.
      Send all of this to:
        Works Performance Products, Inc.
        Attn.: Stock Shock Department.
        21045 Osborne St., Canoga Park, CA 91304
      When the repairs or upgrades are finished and ready to ship, the balance due plus shipping charges will be charged to the credit card, or shipped COD certified funds (money order, cashier's check).

  • STREET BIKE TWIN SHOCKS - (TYPES AND CONSTRUCTION)

    • Q: What's the difference in the types of shocks that you make for street bikes?
    • A: All of our shocks are custom-built to your specifications. Each of the shock types utilizes a computer-designed valving profile, our exclusive check-ball and spring valving concept, a hard- chromed shaft, and quality billet components. All are nitrogen-pressurized for fade-free performance and are fully rebuildable for years of service. The difference between each of the shocks-- steel, chrome, aluminum, the Racer and the Pro Racer-- are the body materials, construction and adjustment features. The steel-bodied shock (Steel Tracker) features a cast eye welded to a steel pressure cylinder. It features clip-type pre-load positioning for the spring set. The bodies are plated in a bright cadmium finish, which is aluminum-like in color. This durable steel body is also available chrome plated (Chrome Tracker).  Options on the steel and chrome shocks are ARS, chrome springs and billet appearance cups.

       The Street Tracker features a billet aluminum shock eye mated to a plated steel pressure cylinder. The eye appearance is a bright, machined finish, which can be polished as an option. The features are a threaded spring preload for easy preload adjustments and a "hidden" nitrogen fill valve for a smooth look. Other billet options, such as billet ARS and billet appearance cups are available for this shock type. The Street Trackers are more attractive than the plain steel shocks, if looks are most important to you.

       The aluminum-bodied shock (Billet Tracker) is machined from 7075 billet aluminum. The appearance is a bright, machined finish, which can be polished as an option. The features are a threaded spring pre-load for easy pre-load adjustments. Other billet options, such as billet ARS and billet appearance cups are available for this shock type. The aluminum shocks are more attractive than the plain steel shocks, if looks are most important to you.

       The Pro Racer and the Racer are piggyback, attached reservoir shocks. The Pro Racer is Works' adjustable compression and rebound shock system. The piggyback shock is a composite design, featuring a steel tube mated to a cast aluminum shock body with an integral, finned reservoir. This reservoir houses a polyurethane bladder that separates the nitrogen from the oil, for exceptional ride and handling. Both have threaded pre-load. Pro Racer bodies are finished in gloss black with highlighted fin edges. The Racer shares many of the body construction features with the Pro Racer, but has Works' check-ball and spring damping pistons. The Racer bodies are available in a light gold finish. Some of the billet options, ARS and chrome springs are available, depending on the length of the shock and other customer requirements.

    • Q: What's the difference in single- and dual-rate springs?
    • A: Depending on each application, either single-rate or dual-rate springs are available. Dual-rate springs are just that-- a spring set with two separate rates. This is done with a short spring stacked on a longer spring. As both springs collapse they result in a soft, or initial, rate. The spring set will retain this initial rate until the short spring stops compressing. At that point, the spring rate "crosses over" to the stiffer, or final, rate. On Works shocks, this "crossover point" is set by means of "crossover spacers" which limit the movement of the short spring. The crossover point is calculated to change the rate at approximately the middle of the wheel travel. By adding or removing these crossover spacers, the rate can get stiffer sooner or stay softer longer. The ARS option allows the rider to select the crossover point. A single-rate spring has the same rate throughout its compressed length. In many short shock applications a single rate is all that can be installed.

    • Q: Is the dual-rate the same as a progressive spring?
    • A: A progressive-wound spring is similar to a dual-rate in that it has an initial and a final rate. The drawback of a progressive spring is that the crossover point is not adjustable.  How the spring is wound determines the characteristics of the spring. Depending on shaft travel of a particular shock, a progressive spring can actually crossover the initial rate in pre-load or not attain the final rate at all. Progressive-wound springs can be a compromise if they are not designed for the specific application.

    • Q: What is the "ARS option?"
    • A: ARS stands for Adjustable Rate Suspension. ARS is an option on most dual-rate spring sets offered for street bikes. The ARS system allows the rider to increase or decrease the load-carrying capacity of the shocks without changing the pre-load of the springs. Depending on the application and spring set, the rider can increase the load capacity of the shocks up to 50 percent. This allows the shocks to be correct for solo riding, but still be able to handle the increased weight of a passenger and/or baggage. ARS can also be employed during solo riding to stiffen the rates for aggressive riding, or for riding on rough, broken pavement.

        The ARS system consists of an indexing lever and a stepped cup that contains the short spring of the dual-rate. The position of the lever in relation to the steps in the cup determines how long the spring set remains on the soft, or initial, rate of the dual-rate spring set. On most ARS applications, four positions can be selected from full stiff to full soft. Indexing is done in a matter of seconds by rotating the lever or the cup by hand.
        The aluminum-bodied shocks, the Racer and Pro Racer have threaded pre-load as standard.

        The ARS cups for these are also threaded to allow the spring pre-load to be changed. Pre-load is changed by turning the cup to either shorten or lengthen the spring stack. When the spring stack is shortened (measured from the retainer to the ARS cup end) the pre-load is increased. That means that the ride height will be higher and the shock will be slightly stiffer. Conversely, if the ARS cup/pre-loader is "unscrewed" the stack will get longer and there is less tension on the spring set. This means that the ride height will be lower and the shocks will be slightly softer. With the ARS system, once the ride height is established, stiffer settings for rough roads or increased load capacity are accomplished by turning the lever -- or the cup if the lever position will cause interference with the tire, chain or belt guard, or passenger.

    • Q: What are the billet appearance cups?
    • A: These are billet aluminum cups that cover one or both ends of a spring, or spring set. They are machined from billet aluminum and retain the machined finish appearance. However, they are also available polished.  The billet appearance cups are available as options on most of the shock types.

  • GENERAL

    • Q: Are all the shocks you offer gas charged?
    • A: Yes, all the shocks we offer are either gas/oil emulsion design - or oil with remote reservoir or piggyback reservoirs with a floating piston and nitrogen gas charge. Gas charged shocks offer the benefit of much more consistent compression and rebound than non-gas charged shocks, much longer life for the oil because nitrogen displaces oxygen which prevents the oil from burning and breaking down, and since it is under pressure it offers higher operating temperature before before the oil boils.

    • Q: What is the difference between reservoir and non-reservoir shocks?
    • A: The shock is exactly the same in valving, travel, spring set for your application. The only design difference is that the non-reservoir design mixes the nitrogen and oil together, as opposed to the reservoir design, which keeps the oil and gas separate. An additional benefit of a reservoir design is the greater oil capacity, which takes longer to heat. The heat from the oil radiates through the hose and reservoir, allowing greater surface area for cooling.

    • Q: How often should Works Performance shocks be rebuilt?
    • A: The body, valves and springs are good for the life of the shock. Service, which includes a seal replacement, oil change and nitrogen charge, have the following recommendations 30-40,000 miles service for street, every 6-12 months for off-road and recreational service, every six months for racers, national level racers every 4-6 races.

    • Q: Is there any benefit of piggyback shock over a hose mounted reservoir design?
    • A: The piggyback design dissipates heat better. The aluminum head and the oil radiate the heat to an aluminum piggyback reservoir better than a braided steel line and oil radiate heat to a remote reservoir.

    • Q: What is the purpose of shock covers?
    • A: Shock covers lengthen the life of seals and protect the shaft from pitting and corrosion. Shock covers prevent pitting of the powder-coated springs as well as the shaft. The shock covers prevent dirt and moisture from sticking to the shaft. Dirt, moisture and mud are a problem as they are abrasives. When they dry, the shaft becomes like sandpaper, which shortens the life of the neoprene seals.

Works Performance • 21045 Osborne Street • Canoga Park CA., 91304
Phone (818) 701-1010 • Fax (818) 701-9043 • E-Mail Us